Hooking Up: Sex, Dating, and Relationships on Campus (Hardcover)

Thanks for helping us catch any problems with articles on DeepDyve. We’ll do our best to fix them. Check all that apply – Please note that only the first page is available if you have not selected a reading option after clicking “Read Article”. Include any more information that will help us locate the issue and fix it faster for you. Instead of dating, college students today socialize with large groups of friends and classmates and pair off to hook up. Hooking up has its own script, with its own norms for how to meet, how to get together, and how to manage relationships. Kathleen Bogle outlines several themes of the hooking up culture that have emerged on today’s college campuses. These include the influence of peers, how the participation in and perception of hookups differs between men and women, and the experiences of this cultural practice after college.

AudioBook Hooking Up: Sex, Dating, and Relationships on Campus

Hooking Up is an intimate look at how and why college students get together, what hooking up means to them, and why it has replaced dating on college campuses. In surprisingly frank interviews, students reveal the circumstances that have led to the rise of the booty call and the death of dinner-and-a-movie. Whether it is an expression of postfeminist independence or a form of youthful rebellion, hooking up has become the only game in town on many campuses.

Bogle, K. A. (). Hooking up: sex, dating, and relationships on campus. New York: New York University Press. Chicago / Turabian – Author Date Citation.

Hooking Up is an intimate look at how and why college students get together, what hooking up means to them, and why it has replaced dating on college campuses. In surprisingly frank interviews, students reveal the circumstances that have led to the rise of the booty call and the death of dinner-and-a-movie. Whether it is an expression of postfeminist independence or a form of youthful rebellion, hooking up has become the only game in town on many campuses. In Hooking Up, Kathleen A.

Bogle argues that college life itself promotes casual relationships among students on campus. The book sheds light on everything from the differences in what young men and women want from a hook up to why freshmen girls are more likely to hook up than their upper-class sisters and the effects this period has on the sexual and romantic relationships of both men and women after college.

Breaking through many misconceptions about casual sex on college campuses, Hooking Up is the first book to understand the new sexual culture on its own terms, with vivid real-life stories of young men and women as they navigate the newest sexual revolution. Hooking up is easy to do if you’re a college student wanting to be popular. Go to a local bar frequented by students, get drunk, make eye contact with someone in the group you’re with, or that you

Citation Styles for “Hooking up : sex, dating, and relationships on campus”

Hooking Up uses interviews with both women and men to understand why dating has declined in favor of a new script for sexual relationships on college campuses. Bogle presents a balanced analysis that explores the full range of hooking-up experiences. As casually as the sexual encounter begins, so it often ends with no strings attached; after all, it was just a hook up.

While a hook up might mean anything from kissing to oral sex to going all the way, the lack of commitment is paramount. Hooking Up is an intimate look at how and why college students get together, what hooking up means to them, and why it has replaced dating on college campuses.

Hooking Up is an intimate look at how and why college students get together, what hooking up means to them, and why it has replaced dating on college.

Hooking Up is an intimate look at how and why college students get together, what hooking up means to them, and why it has replaced dating on college campuses. In surprisingly frank interviews, students reveal the circumstances that have led to the rise of the booty call and the death of dinner-and-a-movie. Whether it is an expression of postfeminist independence or a form of youthful rebellion, hooking up has become the only game in town on many campuses.

In Hooking Up , Kathleen A. Bogle argues that college life itself promotes casual relationships among students on campus. The book sheds light on everything from the differences in what young men and women want from a hook up to why freshmen girls are more likely to hook up than their upper-class sisters and the effects this period has on the sexual and romantic relationships of both men and women after college. Breaking through many misconceptions about casual sex on college campuses, Hooking Up is the first book to understand the new sexual culture on its own terms, with vivid real-life stories of young men and women as they navigate the newest sexual revolution.

Kathleen A. Bogle is a smart interviewer and gets her subjects to reveal intimate and often embarrassing details without being moralizing. This evenhanded, sympathetic book on a topic that has received far too much sensational and shoddy coverage is an important addition to the contemporary literature on youth and sexuality. In her ambitious sociological study, Kathleen Bogle, an assistant professor of sociology and criminal justice at La Salle University, offers valuable insight on the hook-up craze sweeping college campuses and examines the demise of traditional dating, how campus life promotes casual sex, its impact on post-college relationships, and more.

Don’t let your college freshman leave home without it. Hooking Up also serves as a valuable reference for those who seek to understand and decode the sexual terminology and encounters of youth and young adults. Bogles prose engages the reader, and her positive rapport with her interviewees provides confidences typically reserved for best friends.

College and university dating

The journalist Tom Wolfe, a keen observer of American culture, offered this musing on junior high, high school, and college students:. Only yesterday boys and girls spoke of embracing and kissing neck ing as getting to first base. Second base was deep kissing, plus grop ing and fondling this and that. Third base was oral sex. Home plate was going all the way.

That was yesterday.

college campuses over the years, but as is so often the case when sex is discussed, between two people who are not dating or in a serious relationship.

Bogle explores the new sexual culture though real life stories and interviews of college aged students. Hooking up has become an increasingly studied culture by many sociologists around the country. These studies have been done to understand the shift from the old culture of dating to the new culture of hooking up that we experience now. Many people find it interesting that the kids of our generation have become so sexualized and carefree compared to the college days of our parents.

Many people wonder how we got to this point and how the dynamics of hookups work, and why we continue to go on with them. Dating has changed so much over time. However, in the past there have been scripts to follow, or an order to do things in. For example, someone would ask the other person out, they would start dating, get married, move in together, and then have kids. Many people are doing things differently, and in different orders.

As people are becoming more and more tolerant. She explained how young adults shifted from calling on each to dating each other to now hooking up with each other Bogle Throughout her research, Bogle explored.

Campus Sexual and Dating Violence: The Role of Campus Health Centers

She primarily utilizes interview excerpts to reveal the intricacies of the hookup practice and the realities of modern sex and gender norms on campus. The interviews are interesting and revealing of campus culture. However, Bogle intends Hooking Up as a continuation of research on dating customs throughout the ages see Waller ; Waller and Hill but it is more akin to the study of gendered campus interactions in Pledged: The Secret Life of Sororities Robbins

Hooking Up: When a girl and a guy get together for a physical encounter and don​’t necessarily expect anything further. Dating eras have changed dramatically.

Scientific Research An Academic Publisher. Bogle, K. Hooking up: Sex, dating, and relationships on campus. ABSTRACT: Although it is generally assumed that leadership traits are linked to positive outcomes, it is unclear how they might be related to less desirable health behaviors. In a sample of undergraduate students, a series of structural equation models examined the relationship between transformational leadership traits and risky health behaviors i. The models fit the data well and indicated that higher levels of transformational leadership traits were related to higher levels of alcohol consumption and risky sexual behaviors.

It seems that those students who endorse higher transformational leadership characteristics are also embracing negative health behaviors. Related Articles:. Jeffrey M.

Hooking Up: Sex, Dating, And Relationships On Campus Was

This item is sold brand new. It is ordered on demand from our supplier and is usually dispatched within 10 – 15 working days. This evenhanded, sympathetic book on a topic that has received far too much sensational and shoddy coverage is an important addition to the contemporary literature on youth and sexuality. This book should be required reading for college students and their parents!

Bogle doesn’t condemn hooking up, but she does explain it.

Aren’t they just a bunch of sex-hungry dudes? Well, maybe, but DO start off slowly if you’re not used to dating or just got out of a relationship.

Our results suggest that women on campuses where they comprise a higher proportion of the student body give more negative appraisals of campus men and relationships, go on fewer traditional dates, are less likely to have had a college boyfriend, and are more likely to be sexually active. These effects appear to stem both from decreased dyadic power among women on campuses where they are more numerous and from their increased difficulty locating a partner on such campuses.

Collegiate sexual and romantic relationships have captured the attention of writers from across the professional spectrum, including novelists Wolfe , journalists Stepp , and not a few scholars e. These observers note that the formal dating script that calls for men to ask women out on—and pay for—dates is no longer the primary heterosexual relationship script on campus, a change that began as early as the s Bogle Dating is not dead, but it seems increasingly understood as commencing after an exclusive and perhaps even sexual relationship is formed England et al.

Despite the attention that has been paid to college relationships, however, little research has explored how institutional characteristics may influence the romantic and sexual relationships of college students and how these relationships may vary across college campuses with different demographic, cultural, and structural characteristics. One institutional factor that may shape the nature of romantic and sexual relationships among American collegians is the campus sex composition.

This gender imbalance could influence romantic and sexual relationships in two ways. The Sex Ratio Question —suggests that an oversupply of women on a college campus gives men more dyadic power in romantic and sexual relationships, which translates into lower levels of relationship commitment and less favorable treatment of women on the part of men and a more sexually permissive climate.

Although these empirical findings are important in and of themselves for understanding college relationships, college campuses are relatively closed relationship markets compared to other markets e. Thus, studies of college students such as this one provide valuable insight into how market characteristics in this case, sex ratios shape romantic and sexual relationships more generally.

Before moving to our findings, however, we first explain the two possible mechanisms through which sex ratios are thought to influence relationships: dyadic power and demographic opportunity. This thesis is derived from social exchange theory and assumes that individuals seek to maximize their rewards and limit their costs and that this occurs within a market system Blau ; Sprecher

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Intimate Relationships – 8th Edition Rowland S. Miller As casually as the sexual encounter begins, so it often ends with no strings attached; after all, it was “just a hook up. Hooking Upis an intimate look at how and why college students get together, what hooking up means to them, and why it has replaced dating on college campuses. In surprisingly frank interviews, students reveal the circumstances that have led to the rise of the booty call and the death of dinner-and-a-movie.

dating and sexual behavior among college students in her book, Hooking Up: Sex, Dating, and. Relationships on Campus. She closely examines what many.

This study by Bogle, an assistant professor of sociology and criminal justice at LaSalle University—based on 76 interviews with mostly white college students and recent graduates from to —gives a wide range of voices and opinions on hooking-up culture. While there are few surprises women are still, for the most part, subjected to a punishing sexual double standard —Bogle is a smart interviewer and gets her subjects to reveal intimate and often embarrassing details without being moralizing.

She interrogates her subjects about alcohol use, the relationship of gay and lesbian students to hook-up culture, and opting out of hook-up culture. Although limited in scope, this evenhanded, sympathetic book on a topic that has received far too much sensational and shoddy coverage is an important addition to the contemporary literature on youth and sexuality. During the Covid crisis, Publishers Weekly is providing free digital access to our magazine, archive, and website.

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Kathleen A. Bogle, Hooking up: Sex, Dating, and Relationships on Campus

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Best Sellers. AudioBook Hooking Up: Sex, Dating, and. Relationships on Campus ((none)). DETAIL. ○. ○. ○. ○. ○. ○. Author: Kathleen A. Bogle. Pages:

Hookup culture creates unfamiliar environment – to parents, at least Hooking Up: What Educators Need to Know – An op-ed on CHE by the author It happens every weekend: In a haze of hormones and alcohol, groups of male and female college students meet at a frat party, a bar, or hanging out in a dorm room, and then hook up for an evening of sex first, questions later. As casually as the sexual encounter begins, so it often ends with no strings attached; after all, it was “just a hook up.

Hooking Up is an intimate look at how and why college students get together, what hooking up means to them, and why it has replaced dating on college campuses. In surprisingly frank interviews, students reveal the circumstances that have led to the rise of the booty call and the death of dinner-and-a-movie. Whether it is an expression of postfeminist independence or a form of youthful rebellion, hooking up has become the only game in town on many campuses.

In Hooking Up , Kathleen A. Bogle argues that college life itself promotes casual relationships among students on campus. The book sheds light on everything from the differences in what young men and women want from a hook up to why freshmen girls are more likely to hook up than their upper-class sisters and the effects this period has on the sexual and romantic relationships of both men and women after college.

Importantly, she shows us that the standards for young men and women are not as different as they used to be, as women talk about “friends with benefits” and “one and done” hook ups. Breaking through many misconceptions about casual sex on college campuses, Hooking Up is the first book to understand the new sexual culture on its own terms, with vivid real-life stories of young men and women as they navigate the newest sexual revolution.

Hooking up is easy to do if you’re a college student wanting to be popular. Go to a local bar frequented by students, get drunk, make eye contact with someone in the group you’re with, or that you recognize. What happens next may be a matter of negotiation and local expectations, but contrary to popular misconceptions, it doesn’t always mean you’ll have casual sex, oral or otherwise — or lead to a commitment or friendship. Bogle interviewed 76 students and alumni at two universities one a state university, the other a large state university from

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